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Buildings of Interest

Llandrinio Church

Llandrinio Old School

Llandrinio Bridge

Methodist Chapel, Rhos Common

Old Baptist Chapel

Llandrinio Hall

Rodney’s Pillar

Gwernowddy Old Farmhouse

New Hall

Yr Henblas (Unity House)

Rendezvous

Cedar House


Llandrinio Church


There has been a Church at Llandrinio since the 6th Century. When it was first built it was dedicated to St. Trinio but, in 1309, King Edward II granted a concession to the village allowing an annual 3 day fair (centred around The Boat House) on the festivals of St. Peter and St. Paul (28th, 29th and 30th June). People came from near and far to buy and sell their wares and, from that time, the Church became known as St. Trinio, St. Peter and St.Paul. The Fair made Llandrinio an important area, resulting in a busy and bustling economy. The construction of the bridge put an end to the Fairs although the agricultural economy improved as a result.
The Church is a single-chambered structure, retaining architectural features from the Norman period through to the 20th Century. Internally, it has a couple of fragments from one or more early medieval slabs, a Norman font (although one school of thought believes it could be earlier Anglo-Saxon), a limited amount of 17th Century woodwork and a West gallery with painted benefaction boards. The Church bell commemorates the restoration of Charles II and bears the loyal inscription “1661 Rergcns God Save The King”. The Holy Communion Plate dates back to 1680 and the Registers to 1662.
The Churchyard is irregular in shape, part of an earlier and even larger sanctuary which was thought to spread over 5 acres. The entrance to the Churchyard is via the Lych Gate, a timber structure resting on a stonewall base. It was erected to mark the death of Queen Victoria and bears the inscription “AD 1837 Victoria RI AD 1901” on the road side and, when leaving the Churchyard, you are sent away with the message “Bless Thy Going Out And Thy Coming In”. Next to the Lych Gate stands the village’s War Memorial listing the names of those from the area who fell in the Two Great Wars.

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Llandrinio Old School


Sandwiched between the main road and the Churchyard, the school opened on 4th June 1827. In 1873 it underwent an almost complete re-build at a cost of £300. It closed in 1970 and is now used as the base for Outward Bound activities by Highfields School, Wolverhampton. The old school canteen is found down the lane by the Churchyard and is still used by Highfields School. The staff and members of the School join in village activities whenever they can and give an annual concert in the Church every December.

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Llandrinio Bridge


The hump-backed, pink sandstone-built bridge is a Grade I Listed Ancient Monument. It was constructed in 1775 following the Montgomeryshire Turnpike Act of 1769 when £800 was set aside to build a bridge. A ferry previously crossed the river about 40 yards below the bridge. Provision was put in place for its future repair and maintenance by the installation of a toll gate charging the following tolls for crossing the bridge: for every carriage with 4 wheels 4 pence; 2 wheels 2 pence; every horse, mule, ass (laden or un-laden) one halfpenny; every ox, cow or neat cattle, one farthing; every drove of calves, swine, sheep, lambs or goats, 3 pence a score.
The bridge is 132 feet across, has 3 semi-circular arches with triangular cutwaters topped by ball finials.
t was the first stone bridge to be built on the River Severn between its source and Shrewsbury and was strengthened to carry modern traffic in 1977. It was the inspiration for the name and “logo” of the village magazine.
The bridge is flanked either end by two pairs of concrete pillars constructed during World War II, presumably in 1940, when the fear of a German invasion was at its highest. The blocks were positioned to act as ‘tank traps‘ and intended to impede the invaders progress over strategic river crossings. There is also a ‘pillbox’ fortification adjacent to the one nearest the Boat House.

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Methodist Chapel, Rhos Common
The original Chapel (now residential – Dol Hafren) was built in 1835 and enlarged in 1858. A new Chapel was built in red brick in 1907 and a schoolroom was added in 1959. A number of bricks on the new schoolroom have initials and names of benefactors engraved on them – members paid to have a name or initials engraved on a brick and thus raised money to pay for the building of the extension.

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Old Baptist Chapel –now residential (Wiltshire House).
Closed in the early part of the Twentieth Century. Interesting architectural features included the Baptism pool, balcony and small graveyard.

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Llandrinio Hall


The existing Hall was built in, 1682, although the owners of the original Hall can be traced back to 1589. It is a building of considerable historical and architectural significance and is Grade ll* listed. It is one of the earliest Caroline-style large redbrick houses to be built in Montgomeryshire. H-plan with two tall chimneys either side, the windows date to c1790 and it retains two original oak staircases. The house was re-modelled around 1815 and, in 1841, the property passed in to the hands of the Peel family. In the 1970’s a number of unauthorised alterations were made to the building but the present owner has undertaken considerable renovation works.

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Rodney’s Pillar


Not within the Llandrinio area, but dominating the view, the Pillar is visible for many miles and can be seen long before entering the area. For most, at the end of a long journey, when they see the Pillar, they are “home”.
Built in 1781 in honour of Sir George Brydges Rodney, the pillar was officially ‘opened‘ on 10th August 1782. The Shrewsbury Chronicle reported, “The ceremony was opened by Mrs Eyton, Lady of the Manor, accompanied by a numerous train of ladies and gentlemen and preceded by a band of music”. The original Welsh inscription on the pillar read, “The highest pillars will fall, The strongest towers will decay But the fame of Sir George Brydges Rodney shall increase continually And his good name shall never be obliterated“.
Rodney was born in 1718 and died in 1792 although it is not believed he ever visited the area or had anything to do with the erection of the pillar. It is said the pillar was built on Breidden because oak from the area was sold to build Admiral Rodney’s ships and the local landowners wanted to honour him.
Rodney’s followers formed a club, The Breiddenites, which met annually during the 1800’s. The custom was to meet at 1.00 p.m. and dine at the base of the pillar. There were toasts, an address and, among the songs sung, was The Breidden Glee, a song especially composed in honour of the pillar. They would also crown the Poet Ferneat.
Two other monuments to Rodney exist – one in Jamaica and the other one in St. Paul’s Cathedral. Originally the pillar was topped with a ‘golden’ ball, which was destroyed in 1835 by lightning. A new copper ball was installed in 1847 when the original sustained further damage. The last repairs took place in 1967. Well worth a visit.

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Gwernowddy Old Farmhouse
Situated by the junction of Pen-y-Maes Lane and Hendre Lane it was originally a half-timbered house with a thatched roof dating back to the Seventeenth Century, the builder probably being a William ap Guttin ap Howel. The thatched roof has been replaced with slate.

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New Hall
Called the New Hall to distinguish itself from the old Rectory (now called Unity House), which was originally called Henblas (Old Hall). Old timbered house faced with brick in early Nineteenth Century dates back to early Seventeenth Century, the owner in 1630 being Thomas ap Ieuan.

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Yr Henblas (Unity House)
Formerly the rectory, situated South of the Churchyard. A long, 17th Century timber-framed house cased in brick in the 18th Century and much altered. In the mid 15th Century the building on this site was described as a stone-built hall, roofed with tiles, with 9 rooms and surrounded by a moat with a bridge and gateway.

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Rendezvous
Situated down Haimwood believed to be originally called “The Randyvoo”, taking its name from the passage of the Royalist Soldiers with Charles I on his retreat after the Battle of Rowton Heath in 1645

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Cedar House
Imposing 18th Century red-brick house opposite the lay-by next to Trawscoed. For many years was the village post office but, prior to that, believed to have been used as a school with an open fronted shed to the rear where children’s ponies were tethered during the school day.

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